How to Keep Your Domain Information Private

In today’s day and age, terms like “identity theft”, “hack”, and “spam” can get thrown around in routine conversation about your website. There’s an increased sense of the need for better security, and overall, more privacy. Well we agree! Privacy is something that we take seriously, and in particular Domain Privacy.

What’s a WHOIS?

WHOIS, to put it simply, is a type of query that supplies the user with specific information about a domain name. Now, here’s how this may apply to you. When a new domain name is purchased, the “registrant” of the domain is required to provide correct contact information to their registrar. That information is associated with the domain name and a WHOIS record is created. That same record can then be accessed via a WHOIS search by anyone online.

Suffice it to say that if you’ve purchased a domain name your contact information is probably available to the public. Go run a WHOIS search for your domain right now and see what’s out there.

What are my choices?

For some of us, we may want that contact information available when it’s actually beneficial. For example, some businesses may prefer that their WHOIS information is available to anyone, as it provides them with another point of contact for their customers. For the rest of us we just don’t want anyone to have access to that kind of information and would prefer that it remains private. That’s where Domain Privacy comes in.

What is Domain Privacy?

Domain Privacy is an add-on service we provide for our clients who decide they don’t want that information accessible.

“When you add Bluehost Domain Privacy Protection to your domain registration, the only information listed in the WHOIS will be Bluehost.com. You will still be the owner of the domain name, and anyone wanting to contact you from the information on your domain name will have to talk to Bluehost first.”  –  Read more here.

If you’d like to secure your domains today, get started now.

Online marketplaces, purchases, and transactions are a part of our everyday routine. In addition to that, we live in an age which allows anyone with a little time on their hands to set up shop and participate in online business. When you sign up for a hosting account, it’s usually for a personal hobby, such as blogging, or blogging, or blogging. Or it’s because you have a great product/service and you want to share it. Now whether you’re brand new to hosting or a veteran of the web, you know there are many terms to learn. We’ll help you hone in on one of the most important ones to your business, an SSL Certificate. But first, let’s review some factors that influence online transactions.

Why should I get one?

There are several factors that go into making an online purchase, such as price, quantity, and quality. Those values are usually associated with the product itself, right? Getting someone to trust in a product is one thing, but how can you get visitors to trust in your website? The answer is your SSL certificate. Having one allows you to process credit card and other personal info safely and securely. It allows you to become PCI compliant, which is also a must for online business.

What is an SSL Certificate?

To summarize, an SSL certificate on the front end is the badge that let’s all of your visitors or potential customers know that the information they submit via your site is safe. Security is important, privacy is important, trust is important! That’s the beauty of an SSL certificate. It lets your site’s visitors know those things are important to you too. Without one, you will not succeed in getting your products and services to the people that want them. The symbol that appears when your site has an SSL takes care of half of the battle for you.

How does it work?

We know that on the front end, an SSL certificate is represented by a badge; a symbol that your site is the place to be. But how does it work exactly? The main function of an SSL certificate is to encrypt the information that’s submitted via your website in a way that only the actual recipient of the data can utilize it. In short, no one, except for the person or persons who are supposed to receive it, can read it. Sorry identity thieves and hackers, not on our watch.

To add an SSL certificate to your existing Bluehost account today, click here.

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Eric Ross Anderson
Eric Ross Anderson | Contributor

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